Home Theaters Violetta Lukyanenko (Soprano)

Violetta Lukyanenko (Soprano)

Born in Minsk (Belarus).
Graduated from the St Petersburg State Academy of Theatre Art in 2008 (class of A.V. Petrov, People’s Artist of Russia, and singing class of T.V. Groznova). Soloist with the Zazerkalye Children’s Music Theatre since 2008.

Repertoire at the Mariinsky Theatre includes:
Olga (Rusalka)
Marguerite (Faust)

Repertoire also includes:
Adina (L’elisir d’amore), Pamina (Die Zauberflцte), Gerda (The Story of Kai and Gerda), Snegurochka (The Snow Maiden), Lauretta (Gianni Schicchi), Mimм, Musetta (La Bohиme), Emma (Khovanshchina), Micaлla (Carmen), Bess (Porgy and Bess), Antonia (Les Contes d’Hoffmann), Rosalinde (Die Fledermaus), Maria (West Side Story) and Madeleine and Polenka (Cholopka).

Events with Violetta Lukyanenko (Soprano)

3
November
Sunday
Opera
Le nozze di Figaro had its premiere in 1786 at the Burgtheater in Vienna. Lorenzo da Ponte – with wh...Show more
Le nozze di Figaro had its premiere in 1786 at the Burgtheater in Vienna. Lorenzo da Ponte – with whom Mozart later collaborated on Don Giovanni and Così fan tutte – created the libretto. It was based on Pierre Beaumarchais’ controversial play Le Mariage de Figaro, which was banned in Vienna due to its seditious content. David McVicar’s acclaimed production sets the action in a French chateau in 1830 on the eve of revolution, amplifying the opera’s undercurrents of class tension. The entire household is drawn into the notoriously complex plot, which covers all shades of human emotion: spirited playfulness, such as when Figaro sends Cherubino off to war in ‘Non più andrai’, is combined with heartfelt despair, such as the Countess’s grief at her husband’s infidelity in 'Dove sono i bei momenti'. But affection and fidelity prevail in this most warm-hearted of operas: the Count’s plea for forgiveness in the final act, ‘Contessa, perdono’, is one of the most moving moments in opera. Full info
Save15%
Was US$111 Now US$95
View tickets
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17
November
Sunday
Opera
Le nozze di Figaro had its premiere in 1786 at the Burgtheater in Vienna. Lorenzo da Ponte – with wh...Show more
Le nozze di Figaro had its premiere in 1786 at the Burgtheater in Vienna. Lorenzo da Ponte – with whom Mozart later collaborated on Don Giovanni and Così fan tutte – created the libretto. It was based on Pierre Beaumarchais’ controversial play Le Mariage de Figaro, which was banned in Vienna due to its seditious content. David McVicar’s acclaimed production sets the action in a French chateau in 1830 on the eve of revolution, amplifying the opera’s undercurrents of class tension. The entire household is drawn into the notoriously complex plot, which covers all shades of human emotion: spirited playfulness, such as when Figaro sends Cherubino off to war in ‘Non più andrai’, is combined with heartfelt despair, such as the Countess’s grief at her husband’s infidelity in 'Dove sono i bei momenti'. But affection and fidelity prevail in this most warm-hearted of operas: the Count’s plea for forgiveness in the final act, ‘Contessa, perdono’, is one of the most moving moments in opera. Full info
Save15%
Was US$147 Now US$125
View tickets
Book
15
March
Sunday
2020
Opera
Le nozze di Figaro had its premiere in 1786 at the Burgtheater in Vienna. Lorenzo da Ponte – with wh...Show more
Le nozze di Figaro had its premiere in 1786 at the Burgtheater in Vienna. Lorenzo da Ponte – with whom Mozart later collaborated on Don Giovanni and Così fan tutte – created the libretto. It was based on Pierre Beaumarchais’ controversial play Le Mariage de Figaro, which was banned in Vienna due to its seditious content. David McVicar’s acclaimed production sets the action in a French chateau in 1830 on the eve of revolution, amplifying the opera’s undercurrents of class tension. The entire household is drawn into the notoriously complex plot, which covers all shades of human emotion: spirited playfulness, such as when Figaro sends Cherubino off to war in ‘Non più andrai’, is combined with heartfelt despair, such as the Countess’s grief at her husband’s infidelity in 'Dove sono i bei momenti'. But affection and fidelity prevail in this most warm-hearted of operas: the Count’s plea for forgiveness in the final act, ‘Contessa, perdono’, is one of the most moving moments in opera. Full info
Save15%
Was US$111 Now US$95
View tickets
Book